Friday, February 27, 2009

Paddy O'Possum

Skill Level: Easy as pie
Just in time for St Patrick’s day, Paddy O’Possum is stopping by for a pint, with his friends, Brunswick and Stewie. Paddy is a good natured fellow with a bit of an identity crisis; he is often mistaken for a rat.

That’s o.k., Paddy, we love you anyway & if it makes you feel any better, my cats are scared of you & your friends. So have fun, enjoy the all-you-can-eat cat chow on the deck & please watch out for cars. Erin go bragh, Paddy!! Ireland forever!!


Materials: This pattern uses very small amounts of yarn, great use for your stash
G hook for stitching hat
H hook for stitching body
F hook for stitching head, legs, tail & hat
Head, Leg & Tail Yarn: Worsted weight yarn (model stitched in Red Heart Super Saver in Linen
Green yarn remnants for hat (worsted weight)
Body Yarn: Novelty Fur in 2 colors (model is stitched in Yarn Bee & other unknown brand in brown & tan)
Crochet thread #10 size or fingering weight yarn in neutral color, to be combined with the fur yarns for Paddy’s body , (model was stitched in unbleached thread, combined with the 2 novelty furs)
Stuffing
Tapestry needle
Sharp embroidery needle
Black embroidery floss
Safety eyes, (plastic eyes that attach with posts & washers)

Abbreviations:
[ ] = repeat steps in brackets as indicated after bracket
arnd = around
ch= chain
rnds = rounds
sc = single crochet
hdc = half double crochet
sl st = slip stitch
st(s) = stitch, stitches
tog = together

Notes:
Paddy is stitched in un-joined rounds or spirals. His body is crocheted by holding 3 yarns/threads together throughout. For the model, I used a dark fur, light fur & crochet thread.
The crochet thread is used to help define the stitches. When I have tried to crochet with just the fur yarn, I couldn’t see the individual stitches & was thus crocheting blindly. You can substitute fingering weight yarn for the thread, if you like. Just make sure to adjust your hook as needed. Don’t worry about super tight stitches for the body, the fur covers a lot of sins. One final note about the defining thread/yarn, I really don’t think color is that important, as the fur covers most of it.
The head, legs, tail, ears & hat are crocheted in worsted acrylic using an F hook. The head is worked backwards from the customary style. I started at the top of Paddy’s head & ended at his nose.

Body:
Rnd 1: With H hook & holding the 3 yarns together,(2 novelty furs & thread or fingering yarn), sc 6 in an adjustable loop.
Rnd 2: 2 sc in ea st arnd (12 sts)
Rnd 3: [2 sc in st, sc x 1] arnd (18 sts)
Rnd 4: [2 sc in st, sc x 2] arnd (24 sts)
Rnd 5: [2 sc in st, sc x 3] arnd (30 sts)
Rnd 6: [2 sc in st, sc x 4] arnd (36 sts)
Rnd 7: [2 sc in st, sc x 5] arnd (42 sts)
Rnd 8-9: sc arnd (42 sts)
Rnd 10: [sc 2 tog, sc x 5] arnd (36 sts)
Rnd 11: [sc 2 tog, sc x 4] arnd (30 sts)
Rnd 12: sc arnd (30 sts)
Rnd 13: [sc 2 tog, sc x 3] arnd (24 sts)
Rnd 14: [sc 2 tog, sc x 2] arnd (18 sts)
Rnd 15: sc arnd (18 sts)
Rnd 16: [sc 2 tog, sc x 1] arnd (12 sts)
Finish off , stuff firmly & set aside

Head:
Rnd 1: With F hook & tan worsted yarn, 6 sc in adjustable loop
Rnd 2: 2 sc in ea st arnd (12 sts)
Rnd 3: [2 sc in st, sc x 1] arnd (18 sts)
Rnd 4: [2 sc in st, sc x 2] arnd (24 sts)
Rnd 5: [2 sc in st, sc x 3] arnd (30 sts)
Rnd 6: [2 sc in st, sc x 4] arnd (36 sts)
Rnd 7: [sc 2 tog, sc x 4] arnd (30 sts)
Rnd 8: [sc 2 tog, sc x 3] arnd (24 sts)
Rnd 9-10: sc arnd (24 sts)
Rnd 11: [sc 2 tog, sc x 2] arnd (18 sts)
Add eyes now if you are using post & washer type, (safety eyes)
STUFF HEAD AS YOU GO!
Rnd 12: [sc 2 tog, sc x 1] arnd (12 sts)
Rnd 13-14: sc arnd (12 sts)
Rnd 15: [sc 2 tog ] arnd (6 sts)
Finish off & sew nose closed. Embroider nose with black floss.
Ears: make 2
With F hook & worsted yarn, make 6 sc in adjustable loop, finish off leaving long yarn tail for sewing

Tail:
1. With F hook & worsted yarn, 4 sc in adjustable loop.
2. (Instead of counting rounds, count the individual sts) Sc arnd for 64 sts.
3. Skip 1 sc, sc, skip 1 sc (2 sts)
4. continue for about 10 – 15 more sts & finish off, weave end at tip of tail but leave long at base of tail for attaching to body.

Legs: (make 4)
Rnd 1: With F hook & tan worsted yarn, 6 sc in adjustable loop
Rnd 2: [2 sc in st, sc x 2] arnd (8 sts)
Rnd 3-9: sc arnd (8 sts)
Finish off, stuff firmly

Finishing:
Attach ears, head, legs & tail as shown in photo.

Hat: (striped version) Work in joined rounds
Rnd 1: With G hook & light green worsted yarn, 6 sc in adjustable loop, join & ch 1
Rnd 2: 2 sc in ea st arnd, add dark green yarn during last step of last sc , join & ch 1(12 sts)
Alternating light & dark green, work in striped pattern for the following rnds;
Rnd 3: [2 sc in st, sc x 1] arnd, join & ch 1 (18 sts)
Rnd 4-10: sc arnd, alternating the greens , join & ch 1(18 sts)
Finish dark green yarn off
Rnd11: with the right side or outside of the hat facing you, sc in the outside loop only, arnd for 18 sts, join with sl st.
Rnd 12: [2 Hdc in st, hdc in next 2 sts] arnd, join (24 sts)
Rnd 13: sc arnd , join & finish off (24 sts)
Weave & trim ends, place on Paddy’s head & off to the pub you go…

Paddy O’Possum is my own design. Use it if you like. You can even sell him if you can find a buyer. Just please credit me as designer or I'll tell yore Mama. Thanks!! Oh & let me see your versions of him…

Thursday, February 26, 2009

Paddy O'Possum coming SOON...

It's that time again, (well almost, anyway), St Patrick's day! We used to paint the town green when I was a young girl in Savannah. It was always a holiday from school & we would all go downtown to watch the parade. Love it!!!

Hey, I know NYC has a grand celebration but it's COLD up there!! Savannah is the place for St Patrick's day celebrations. So in honor of my heritage & my love for all things Irish & my multiple generations of possums, (who grow fat & sassy on my cats' meow mix), I give you, "Paddy O'Possum"....(well stay tuned anyway, he has a photo-shoot today & I need to type up the directions). So for now Erin Go Bragh! & stay tuned.

Tuesday, February 24, 2009

BobbiSue Q & Hush Puppy Amigurumi(s)

What's not to love about BobbiSue Q & her side-kick, Hush Puppy? They are the perfect combo. BobbiSue comes with her own soft bun to lie down on & a blanket of BBQ sauce to keep the chill out & to top things off, she has an adorable dill pickle-slice hat; a perfect compliment to her ensemble. Let's not forget her trusty companion, Hush Puppy. He is loyal & true with just the slightest taste of minced onions in the batter. Um UMMMMMMMM! When do we eat?

BobbiSue Q is about 3 " tall when she is lying in her bun. BobbiSue alone is about 1" thick & 5" long from tail to snout. She is stuffed very loosely. Her bun is 4 1/2 " diameter & about 1 " tall for each piece. They are stuffed loosely as well.
Hush Puppy is 1 1/2 " in diameter and is stuffed firmly.
Materials:
F hook
worsted yarn (model stitched in Red Heart #0774 Light Raspberry, #0336 Warm Brown & an off-white acrylic yarn of unknown origin and Red Heart remnants in green for pickle)
tapestry needle
sharp embroidery needle
felt: brown & black
glue
stuffing
long toothpick
Gauge:
sorry but I'm lazy about gauge when doing these toys, just make sure the hook you are using gives you a tight stitch, otherwise go down a size.

Notes:
pieces are stitched in unjoined spiral rounds unless otherwise indicated
[ ] = repeat steps in brackets as indicated after bracket
arnd = around
ch= chain
rnds = rounds
sc = single crochet
hdc = half double crochet
sl st = slip stitch
st(s) = stitch, stitches
tog = together
BobbiSue & buns are loosely stuffed
Hush Puppy is stuffed tightly

BOBBI-SUE: (head & body are one shape)

Rnd 1: with F hook & light raspberry yarn, sc 6 times in adjustable loop
Rnd 2: [2 sc in ea st ] arnd (12 sts)
Rnd 3: [2 sc in st, sc x 1] arnd (18 sts)
Rnd 4: [2 sc in st, sc x 2] arnd (24 sts)
Rnd 5: [2 sc in st, sc x 3] arnd (30 sts)
Rnd 6: [2 sc in st, sc x 4] arnd (36 sts)
Rnd 7-9: [sc in ea st] arnd (36 sts) Place eyes if using safety eye that attach with posts & washers
Rnd 10: [2 sc tog, sc x 4] arnd (30 sts)
Rnd 11-16: [sc in ea st] arnd (30 sts)
Rnd 17: [2 sc in st, sc x 4] arnd (36 sts)
Rnd 18: [sc in ea st ] arnd (36 sts)
Rnd 19: [sc 2 tog, sc x 4] arnd (30 sts)
Rnd 20: [sc 2 tog, sc x 3] arnd (24 sts)
Rnd 21: [sc 2 tog, sc x 2] arnd (18 sts)
Rnd 22: [sc 2 tog, sc x 1] arnd (12 sts) Stuff very loosely !
Rnd 23: [sc 2 tog, sc x 4] arnd (10 sts)
Rnd 24: [sc 2 tog] arnd (5 sts)
Rnd 25: sc 2 tog sc 1, sc 2 tog (3 sts)
Rnd 26: sc 2 tog, sc 1 (2 sts)
Rnd 27: sc 2 tog (1 st) & chain 12, finish off . Tack tail into coiled shape with end of yarn, weave in loose ends.

SNOUT:
Rnd 1: with F hook, sc 6 sts in adjustable loop
Rnd 2: sc x 6, 2 sc in last st (8 sts)
Rnd 3-4: sc in ea st arnd x 2
finish off leaving long yarn tail

EARS: (make 2)
Rnd 1: sc 4 sts in adjustable loop
Rnd 2: 2 sc in ea st arnd (8 sts)
Rnd 3-4: sc in ea st arnd
finish off, leaving tail for sewing, do not stuff

LEGS: (make 4)
Rnd 1: 6 sc in adjustable loop
Rnd 2 - 4: sc in ea st arnd (6 sts)
finish off leaving tail for sewing, do not stuff

FINISHING:
Sew legs, ear & snout on as shown.

Embroider or glue on facial features as desired.

PICKLE:
Rnd 1: with F hook & green yarn 6 sc in adjustable loop

Rnd 2: 2 sc in ea st arnd (12 sts)

Rnd 3: 2 hdc in st, sc x 2 , 2 hdc in st, hdc in next st, sc x 3, 2 sc in next st, sl st into next st & finish off

BBQ Sauce Blanket: cut bumpy circle out of brown felt, big enough to drape over pig without covering her entirely.

BUN:
Top Bun: with warm brown yarn & F hook
Rnd 1: 6 sc in adjustable loop, join w/sl st & ch 1
Rnd 2: 2 sc in ea st arnd, join & ch 1 (12 sts)
Rnd 3: [sc x 1, 2 sc in next st] arnd, join & ch 1 (18 sts)
Rnd 4: [2 sc in st, sc x 2] arnd, join & ch 1 (24 sts)
Rnd 5: [sc x 3, 2 sc in next st] arnd, join & ch 1 (30 sts)
Rnd 6: [2 sc in st, sc x 4] arnd, join & ch 1 (36 sts)
Rnd 7: [sc x 5, 2 sc in next st] arnd, join & ch 1 (42 sts
Rnd 8: [2 sc in st, sc x 6] arnd, join & ch 1 (48 sts)
Rnd 9: [sc x 7, 2 sc in next st] arnd, join & ch 1 (54 sts)
Rnd 10-12: [sc in ea st arnd (54 sts) change yarn to off-white in last st, finish off the brown yarn
Rnd 13: [sc 2 tog, sc x 7] arnd, join & ch 1 (48 sts)
Rnd 14: [sc x 6, sc 2 tog] arnd, join & ch 1 (42 sts)
Rnd 15: [sc 2 tog, sc x 5] arnd, join & ch 1 (36 sts)
Rnd 16: [sc x 4, sc 2 tog] arnd, join & ch 1 (30 sts)
Rnd 17: [sc 2 tog, sc x 3] arnd, Do not join for remainder of rounds (24 sts)
Rnd 18: [sc x 2, sc 2 tog] arnd (18 sts)
Rnd 19: [sc 2 tog, sc x 1] arnd (12 sts)
Stuff lightly, making sure to fill out edges of bun, do not overfill or bun will not lay flat
Rnd 20: sc 2 tog arnd & finish off, weaving & trimming edges

Bottom Bun: with warm brown yarn & F hook
Rnd 1-8: Repeat steps 1-8 for top bun (48 sts)
Rnd 9: working in back loop only, sc arnd, join & ch 1 (48 sts)
Rnd 10: Sc arnd, join & ch 1 (48 sts) add off white yarn to last st & finish off brown yarn
Rnd 11: With off white yarn & working in back loop only, [sc x 6, 2 sc tog] arnd, join & ch 1 (42 sts)
Rnd 12: [2 sc tog, sc x 5] arnd, join & ch 1 (36 sts)
Rnd 13: [sc x 4, sc 2 tog] arnd, do not continue to join rnds (30 sts)
Rnd 14: [sc 2 tog, sc x 3] arnd (24 sts)
Rnd 15: [sc x 2, sc 2 tog] arnd (18 sts)
Rnd 16: [sc 2 tog, sc x 1] arnd (12 sts)
Stuff lightly making sure to fill edges, do not overfill
Rnd 17: sc 2 tog arnd, weave ends & finish off
HUSH PUPPY: work in unjoined spirals
Rnd 1-5: with warm brown & F hook, repeat steps 1-5 of the top bun, as above (30 sts)
Rnd 6: sc in ea st arnd (30 sts)
Rnd 7: [sc x 3, sc 2 tog] arnd (24 sts)
Rnd 8: sc in ea st arnd (24 sts)
Rnd 9: [sc 2 tog, sc x 2] arnd (18 sts)
Rnd 10: [sc x 1, sc 2 tog] arond (12 sts)
Stuff firmly
Rnd 11: sc 2 tog arnd & finish off, weaving & trimming ends

FINISHING:
Embroider eyes, brows & nose using french knots, running st & satin sts.
Cut dog ears from felt, hot glue or sew on with black thread.

BobbiSue Q & Hush Puppy are my personal designs but please feel free to make them & sell them if you like, just please credit me as designer. I'd love to see your version.

Friday, February 20, 2009

That's no cat....

O.K. , so I have a few cats. Isn't that the stereotypical knitter profile; female with multiple cats a la "Crazy Aunt Purl"? Well I have 3, (4 if you count the next door neighbor cat who has adopted us). Most of the time they stay outside....bad me!! Can't help it, I have allergies. We feed them in the back enclosed deck, they have a pretty good life.

Ya'll know what's coming next,right? The cat food is a wild critter magnet & word has gotten around about the all-you-can-eat cat chow buffet at our house. We have birds, squirrels, other cats (occasionally), and of course POSSUMS. We are on our 3rd or 4 th generation now. They grow up so quickly, only to have babies of their own , who come back to feed at our house. By now they must be on their way to evolving some kind of internal tracking instinct or migratory programming, leading them back to us, the old folks at home.

They are kind of cute when they are little but only from a distance, I don't trust those teeth. Oh & the cats don't mind them one bit nor do they mind any of the aforementioned animals either. They are too full & lazy to care. It's a peaceable kingdom at our house.

Thursday, February 19, 2009

Projects I'm working on...

I have so many projects going; either in my mind, already underway & housed in those reusable grocery bags or sketched in my spiral bound notebook(s) or any combination thereof. Trouble is, I'm not known for my organizational skills. Suffice it to say that I have notebooks scattered around with bits & pieces of various ideas in all of them...not a one of them has a coherent project laid out from start to finish. See, I'm afraid I'll forget the inspiration that pops into my head so I grab the nearest notebook & jot it down. When the time comes to write out the pattern I have to glean these bits from all of the books & put them together in an organized fashion. Ha! Did I mention that "Scattered" is my middle name?

I'm also working on finishing some baby blankets & hats for charity. I'm knitting some of the hats & crocheting the blankets because I can do so quicker than knitting.

If that's not enough, I'm making a throw for ME out of all of the little balls of leftover yarn. I'm simply crocheting rows of half double crochet stitches. It will be the blanket of many colors for sure, but I am enjoying the frugal-ness of it. Just like our pioneer fore-mothers, right? I'll post pictures & patterns as I can.

Tuesday, February 17, 2009

A "Few" More Words About BBQ...

We've discussed what BBQ is & isn't & talked about the all-important family favorite sauce, sounds like we've got the BBQ subject covered. Not quite. When you go to a BBQ restaurant the waitress might ask you whether you want sliced or chopped BBQ. Well sliced is obviously just that; sliced. But chopped is a whole 'nother concern...Any real barbecue can be easily pulled apart with a fork due to the slow cooking, which adds wonderful tenderness. Oftentimes this is referred to as "pulled pork", and is my favorite way to eat it.
Beware though, when a restaurant is serving chopped barbecue, especially if you don't see wood stacked up around back or smell real smoke. Some people actually just cook a pork roast until it's done, at 350 degrees or so. When the pork is done in about an hour or 2, they take it out of the oven and actually chop it, with a knife no less. This is NOT barbecue, the texture is off, even if they cook it on the grill, it's not the same thing.

Behold...pulled pork or chopped pork, either name is acceptable.

Speaking of stacked wood, this is always a telltale sign of real barbecue. One of my family's favorite restaurants in Marietta, Georgia was Williamson Brothers. They had wood stacked up the wah-zoo & smoke ; delicious hickory smoke was always wafting on the breeze, whetting our appetites. If that didn't convince you, there was a huge wood burning oven, with an open front, smack dab in the middle of the place. You couldn't miss it. And there'd be a man with a huge pitchfork -looking utensil, stabbing the roasting butts & turning them over as the HUGE spit slowly turned revealing more roasting butts. The walls were kind of covered in soot from decades of wood smoke. Yum, I'm getting hungry.
Then in Huntsville, Alabama we loved Greenbriar barbecue. They served baskets of hush puppies at the table and had some delicious sauce that they called "white barbecue sauce", which was used for the grilled ham steaks they had on the menu. My favorite there was the barbecue, but occasionally my husband would get the ham, so I've tasted it with the sauce and I'm here to say that it is wonderful. Incidentally, I know how they make the white sauce; mayonnaise, vinegar & LOTS of black pepper. The sauce is thin when the consistency is correct, so don't worry. Sorry but this is as close to a recipe for this sauce as I can get. I always just mix mine until it "looks right".Try it, you'll like it!

Monday, February 16, 2009

A "Few" Words About Bar-B-Q















Bar-B-Q, BBQ, Barbecue....
Let's talk about what it's NOT. Contrary to some folks' upbringing, the word Barbecue is NOT a verb. It's not some action as in; "We 're going to barbecue some burgers tonight". Oh and Barbecue is NOT cooked in a regular oven & then doused & smothered with smoke-flavored ketchup-y sauce...that's false advertising to put barbecue on the menu, only to find out that it's the latter.

What it IS...Down here the word Barbecue is considered a noun as in, "We're having barbecue for supper tonight". To which some of you might ask, "barbecued what?". I'm here to tell you that this question has never occurred to me or my fellow southerner's. Barbecue is almost always a pork roast, either a shoulder or a butt, that is slow cooked either in a pit or other grill/smoker/outside fireplace. Now some folks like a beef brisket, so that's why I said "almost". It wasn't popular where I grew up. Personally, I've tried it & didn't like it.
A final point of clarifciation I'd like to make is, if we weren't having barbecue but the meat for the meal was being cooked on the grill we were having a "Cook-out", to which the question "what are we cooking out?" would be appropriate. ( But that's another subject for another day)

Now that I've defined barbecue, let's talk about sauce; a touchy subject over which many a feud has started, lasting generations. Everyone's barbecue sauce is the "BEST", in their minds anyway. Family favorite barbecue sauces are as individual & unique as tartans are to the old Scottish clans.

Some sauce is thin & more like a marinade & some is thicker, more like the consistency of thinned ketchup. Make no mistake though, the popular BBQ sauce brand in the stores,(ya'll know which one I mean), is NOT barbecue sauce! It's sauce & might even be pretty good but it's too thick and the version with the fake smoke in it makes me cringe with memories of fake-smoke flavored indigestion.

My family has had several favorites growing up... when I was a little girl, a toddler really, my family's sauce of choice was Johnny Harris sauce, from the Johnny Harris restaurant in Savannah.
Several years later, I stumbled across a bottle of it in Atlanta & brought my treasure home to introduce it to MY children & husband, (who was an Ollie's BBQ man, by the way). After a huge build-up about how superb this sauce was & slow cooking the pork, we finally were at the moment of truth. Would my family like it? What will my husband think of it? Will I still like it after all these years? And perhaps the most horrific thought; "have they possibly changed the recipe over the years"?

SUCCESS!! Everyone enjoyed the sauce. Johnny Harris sauce is one of the thick sauces. No, it's not so thick you can stand a drumstick in it, (remember those commercials?). It is one of the "thick" sauces that still pours, (like how A-1 pours or thinned down ketchup), with just enough heat to warm your mouth without burning your taste buds. And honestly, tasting it after all these years, there was a slight after taste of lemon, hmmmm? Secret ingredient??? Or was it just me. I still rank Johnny Harris sauce amongst one of my favorites.
More on barbecue later...Oh & I am working on a barbecue amigurumi pattern. Hope to post it soon.

Friday, February 13, 2009

Bubba Goober & Tater Pea Amigurumi Pattern

Though much maligned by recent negative press, Bubba Goober & his cousin Tater Pea are a couple of true-blue homeboys from down here in the south.

Bubba Goober is about 5” tall & sports a grown out buzz cut . Bubba G, as his friends call him, fancies himself a ladies man. He used to chew but now he dips snuff, which he feels is far more sophisticated than chew and not nearly so messy; just a pinch betwixt his teeth & gums.

Tater Pea is a nickname Bubba gave his cousin, since he looks so much like a potato. Tater always wears his favorite lucky camo ball cap. He enjoys chewing tobacco and always has a chaw in his cheek. For a fresh wad, he keeps his pouch of chew in his back pocket. Materials & Supplies:
Any worsted weight yarn (model is stitched in Red Heart Super Saver Warm Brown & Red Heart Super Saver Camo)
US F crochet hook (3.75mm)
US G crochet hook
Stitch marker
Yarn needle
Sharp embroidery needle
Black embroidery floss
Polyester filler
Plastic filler pellets
Dark knee high hose (for holding pellets)
felt - for constructing the bill of the ball cap
Glue

Gauge: not important, just be sure that the hook size gives you a tight stitch, otherwise go down a size.

Notes: Both are worked in single crochet spirals. Do not join after each round.
[ ] = repeat steps in brackets as indicated after bracket
arnd = around
rnds = rounds
sc = single crochet
st(s) = stitch, stitches
tog = together

TATER PEA (body):

Rnd 1: sc 6 times in adjustable loop, pull tail tightly to close hole
Rnd 2: 2 sc in each st arnd, (12 sts)
Rnd 3: [2 sc in st, sc in next st] arnd, (18 sts)
Rnd 4: [2 sc in st, sc in next 2 sts] arnd, (24 sts)
Rnd 5: [2 sc in st, sc in next 3 sts] arnd, (30 sts)
Rnd 6: [2 sc in st, sc in next 4 sts] arnd, (36)
Rnd 7-10: sc around, (36 sts)
Rnd 11: [sc 2 tog, sc in next 4 sts] arnd, (30 sts)
Rnd 12-13: sc around, (30 sts)
Rnd 14: [sc 2 tog, sc in next 3 sts] arnd, (24 sts)
Rnd 15-16: sc arnd, (24 sts) 2 times
Rnd 17: [2 sc in st, sc in next 3 sts] arnd, (30 sts)
Rnd 18: [2 sc in st, sc in next 4 sts] arnd, (36 sts)
Rnd 19-20: sc around, (36 sts)
Rnd 21: [sc 2 tog, sc in next 4 sts] arnd, (30 sts)
Rnd 22-23: sc arnd (30 sts)
Rnd 24: [sc 2 tog, sc in next 3 sts] arnd, (24 sts)
Rnd 25: sc arnd (24 sts)

Fill the toe of a dark knee-high stocking with about ¼ Cup, (or a little less), of plastic pellets. Tie securely & cut off some of the excess stocking. Stuff into the bottom half of “Bubba”. Add polyester fiber filling as needed to fill out the body.

If using safety eyes, place in desired location now. Continue to stuff firmly as you finish these last few rnds.
Rnd 26: [sc 2 tog, sc next 2] arnd (18 sts)
Rnd 27: [sc 2 tog, sc next st] arnd (12 sts)
Cut & thread tail into tapestry needle, weave into sts arnd & tie off.


BUBBA GOOBER(Body):
Rnd 1-5: Complete rounds 1-5 from the Tater Pea pattern
Rnd 6-9: sc arnd (30 sts)
Rnd 10: [sc 2 tog, sc in next 3 sts] arnd (24 sts)
Rnd 11-12: Sc arnd (24 sts)
Rnd 13: [sc 2 tog, sc in next 2 sts] arnd (18 sts)
Rnd 14: sc arnd (18 sts)
Rnd 15: [2 sc in st, sc in next 2 sts] arnd (24 sts)
Rnd 16: [2 sc in st, sc in next 3 sts] arnd (30 sts)
Rnd 17-19: sc arnd (30 sts)
Rnd 20: [2 sc tog, sc in next 3 sts] arnd (24 sts)
Rnd 21: sc arnd (24 sts) Stuff & add eyes now if using safety eyes!
Rnd 22: [sc 2 tog, sc in next 2 sts] arnd (18 sts)
Rnd 23: [sc 2 tog, sc in next st] arnd (12 sts)
Cut yarn & weave through remaining 12 sts, pulling tightly to close. Finish customizing Bubba & don't forget to make his back pocket.

Add hair using fun fur or other material, (models' hair is hotglued on)

BACK POCKET: With F hook, Ch 5.
Row 1: Working in rows, sc in 2nd ch from hook & across, ch 1& turn.
Row 2-5: Sc across, ch 1 & turn
Finish off & attach to the backside of Bubba & Tater, where a jean pocket would be. Remember to leave the top open so they can put their tobacco & what-not in it.

CHEW PACKAGE: Make tobacco package out of brown paper. Simply decorate to look like a bag of chew, glue together & fold. Place in back pocket of Tater when he is done.

SNUFF CAN: cut a piece of felt into a circle & place in Bubba's back pocket

BALL CAP: Cap is stitched in joined rounds
Rnd 1: with G hook sc 6 in adjustable loop, join w/ sl st & ch 1
Rnd 2: 2 sc in ea st arnd, join & ch 1 (12 sts)
Rnd 3: [2 sc in st, sc in next] arnd, join & ch 1 (18 sts)
Rnd 4: [2 sc in st, sc in next 2 sts] arnd, join & ch 1 (24 sts)
Rnd 5: [2 sc in st, sc in next 3 sts] arnd, join & ch 1 (30 sts)
Rnd 6: [2 sc in st, sc in next 4 sts] arnd, join & ch 1 (36 sts)
Rnd 7-8: sc arnd 2 times
Rnd 8: Sl st arnd outside edge for finished look, cut yarn & weave ends
For the bill of the cap cut a piece of felt into a ballcap bill shape & sew or hot glue along edge.

Finishing Suggestions:
Embroider mouth using black embroidery floss, as shown in photo or in your own style.
For "tobacco cheek", make one bobble at the corner of the mouth, using the brown yarn.
Construct tobacco pouch with a small bit of brown paper bag & a design reduced in size to fit the front of the package, (use your imagination on what design to use).









Make your own accessories for the boys.

“Bubba Goober & Tater Pea" is my personal design. However, feel free to spread some Goober-love by linking this pattern to your websites & blogs. I also give my permission for you to make & sell Bubba. If you DO any of the aforementioned, please just give me a shout out. Oh & I’d LOVE to see pictures of your versions of my pattern. Thanks! nanderson360.MissJulep@blogger.com
Visit Bubba G, Tater Pea & me at http://yarnjulepsontheveranda.blogspot.com/

Peanuts Have Feelings Too....

I've been thinking about the noble peanut lately, as we all have, I'm sure, due to the recent BAD press it is getting. The peanut or goober-pea is natures' perfect food, packed with protein & yummy goodness.

So in honor of the recently maligned peanut, (hey it's not the fault of this delicious legume that salmonella has tarnished "his" reputation), I am working on a free crochet pattern which I call "Bubba Goober". He is a good ol' boy from down home. In fact, there is a peanut field right across the road from where I work, how's that for "down-home"? I'm almost finished with him & I will post the pattern here. If there is anyone out there, "hello? hello? anyone?", please stay turned, he's almost done.....

Thursday, February 12, 2009

Mint Juleps, the "Ultimate" Southern Beverage

Despite the title of this blog, I have NEVER had a Mint Julep, as Hollywood would have us believe,regarding life in the south. I've had mint in iced tea or sweet tea, as we call it and it is so refreshing.

Apparently the Mint Julep is the official drink of the Kentucky Derby. I've never been to a horse race either. But if I go I will definitely have a Mint Julep. We are big on tradition down here.

We are having balmy weather for February, which is wonderful considering we are smack dab in the middle of the Mardi Gras season. From what I can gather, the official adult beverage of Mardi Gras is Jello shooters, if you are riding on a float during an especially cold night, (no spillage) & anything else if you are amongst the revelers and ball attendees. I have never had a Jello shooter either & am certain I wouldn't like it.

Once I saw an episode of "COPS in New Orleans", filmed during Mardi Gras ,(pre-Katrina days). One intoxicated reveler either punched the mounted policeman's horse or threw his beer bottle at it, I 've forgotten which. The point is, WHY? It really didn't make much sense & it was mean. Needless to say the reveler got grabbed up by the scruff of the neck & most likely got to "sleep it off" courtesy of the City of N.O. police department.

New Orleans is not the only area that celebrates Mardi Gras. There are Krewe's, parades & observances all along the gulf coast, from Louisiana to Florida. I suppose I enjoy the thought of it more than actual participation, probably because it makes our area unique & colorful & each year when the purple, green & gold items are put out in the stores & the bakeries are selling King's cake, spring is right around the corner.

Wednesday, February 11, 2009

Day 1

Day 1 of my very first blog.

I'm a southerner, born & raised. I've been eating boiled peanuts, watermelon, grits, hushpuppies and cornbread dressing for as long as I can remember. I probably broke in my first baby teeth on hot boiled peanuts. I count amongst some of my first smell memories the indescribable aroma of peanuts & heavily salted water simmering on the stove. Thankfully, I can re-live this revery as often as I like, when the green peanuts are in season. And I do.

Give me a bowl of boiled peanuts & I can not for the life of me stop eating until my fingers are as wrinkled as prunes & coated with more salt than folks use in a week. The only problem is that I like to knit & crochet. A LOT. And I can't do both at the same time.

Some people can't stand boiled peanuts, even southern people.
I had a boyfriend when I was in high school who not only disliked boiled peanuts, that I had built up as one of the best treats ever, but he spit it out & proceeded to make quite a show of wiping his tongue off with a paper towel. We were all speechless. I suppose I don't need to tell you that he wasn't from around here, right?

Believe it or not I have a husband who doesn't like boiled peanuts at all, but I married him anyway. I'm trying to remember if I knew about his aversion to boiled peanuts before we said "I do". My dog doesn't like them either but my children do. At least they turned out o.k.